Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘parmesan’

Homemade pappardelle blended with sauteed leeks, chives, lemon zest, arugula, prosciutto, and a dusting of Parmesan cheese.

Wine: Domaine de l’Aigle à deux têtes Côtes du Jura 2008

cotesdujuraNotes:

Yeah, that was a mouthful just to type!  If any of your are looking to plumb the depths of what wine explorers term “interesting”, you can start with a Côtes du Jura. This tiny little region in France is known for producing some particularly interesting wines such as their vin jaune (yellow wine).  This particular wine was not one of their most interesting ones, but fun and a good pairing nonetheless.  As an extra feature, they even dip the tops of their bottles in wax.  I personally think that just makes it harder and messier to open, but there are people who enjoy the extra touch.  It’s a blend of Chardonnay and a few other grapes that most people (even your most learned wine friends) wouldn’t recognize.  The wine carries a lovely acidity dominated primarily by lemon that brought out the lemon zest in the dish.  The rest of the body was a nice match for a this plate that was perfect for a cold winter’s night without actually being “heavy”.  It was adequately filling and fresh.

Read Full Post »

Rating: 4/5

Lasagna layered with homemade pasta noodles, sauce composed of browned ground turkey in tomatoes, onion, garlic, yellow pepper, basil, rosemary, caraway seeds, and salt/pepper, fresh spinach leaves and a cheese blend of ricotta, asiago and parmesan.

Wine: Tenuta Sant’Antonio “Mont Garbi” Ripasso

Notes:

Valpolicella is generally known for two types of wine.  One is their standard blend of Corvina Veronese, Rondinella and Molinara which is a lighter, aromatic wine and generally flies under the radar of enthusiasts.  The other is Amarone, which is made from the same grapes, but the grapes are dried ahead of time and then fermented into a rich and dry wine.  Amarone is the popular kid out of Valpolicella and its price tag generally reflects this.  However, at some point, a very enterprising wine maker decided to take the leftovers from Amarone and blend them with some of the standard blend to create a middle of the road wine which turned out to be pretty good.  They called it Ripasso and it officially got recognized in December 2009 with a DOCG status (which means they could put the word “Ripasso” on a bottle and it would mean something).

Anyway, this paired nicely with the lighter lasagna.  The wine delivers all sorts of red fruits upfront, but has enough structure and spice in the end to make it play wonderfully with the ricotta cheese and the caraway.  Simply Italian.  Enough said.

Read Full Post »